The SJTPO Region is made up of New Jersey’s four southern-most counties including Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, and Salem. The region is 1,778 square miles and 30.7% water. Atlantic County is the densest but is followed by Cape May, Cumberland, then Salem. With a population density of about 367 persons per square mile, over 600,000 residents (2010 Census) call the Region home, with over half of the population living in the Region’s largest cities and towns.

Major Roadways that traverse the Region include, Interstate 295, the New Jersey Turnpike, The Garden State Parkway, the Atlantic City Expressway, US Routes 9, 30, 40, 130, 206 and 322. Major State Routes include 45, 47, 49, 50, 54, 55, 56, and 77. To download the SJTPO Regional Profile, click here.

Information About Our Counties

Draft Plan Statistics

Population Current Summer Population Annual Employment
Current – 276,000
Projected (2040) – 318,200
Weekday (Residents + Visitors) – 564,945
Weekend (Residents + Visitors) – 643,404
Current – 165,000
Projected (2040) – 170,800

Atlantic County includes 23 municipalities and features a total population of over 250,000.  Its county seat is Mays landing and its most populous place is Egg Harbor Township with over 40,000 residents. This county forms the Atlantic City-Hammonton Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also part of the Delaware Valley combined Statistical Area.

As of the 2010 United States Census, the population density of Atlantic county was 494.1 per square mile and the housing unit average density was 227.9 per square mile.  The racial makeup of the county was 65.4% white, 16.08% Black or African American, .38% Native American, 7.5% Asian, .03% Pacific Islander, 7.36% from other races, and 3.24% form two or more races.  Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 16.84% of the population.  The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.17.

As of 2010 the county had a total of 1,930.77 miles of roadways maintained by various entities: 1,367.05 miles by local municipalities, 372.63 miles by Atlantic County, 143.5 miles by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, and 57.59 miles by either the New Jersey turnpike Authority or south Jersey Transportation Authority.  Major roadways include the Garden State Parkway and the Atlantic City Expressway.

Draft Plan Statistics

Population Current Summer Population Annual Employment
Current – 94,700
Projected (2040) – 79,500
Weekday (Residents + Visitors) – 506,548
Weekend (Residents + Visitors) – 665,990
Current – 63,500
Projected (2040) – 68,900

Cape May County includes 17 municipalities and is the southernmost county in New Jersey. Its county seat is Cape May Court House and its most populous municipality is Lower Township.  The total population of Cape May County is over 90,000. Most of the county lies on a peninsula that juts into the Delaware Bay.

As of the 2010 United States Census, the population density of Cape May County was 401 per square mile and the housing unit average density was 357 per square mile.  The racial makeup of the county was 91.57% White, 5.06% Black or African American, .18% Native American, .65% Asian, .04% Pacific Islander, 1.35% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races.  Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.3% of the population.  The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.94.

A consistently popular summer destination with 30 miles of beaches, Cape May attracts vacationers from New Jersey and surrounding states with the summer population exceeding 800,000. Tourism generates annual revenues of $5.3 billion, making it the county’s single largest industry, with leisure and hospitality being Cape May’s largest employment category. The commercial fishing industry is also important in Cape May County.

The southern terminus of the Garden State Parkway, known as Exit Zero, is in the county.  The parkway passes through the length of the county, heading north to Egg Harbor Township in the north in Atlantic County.

Draft Plan Statistics

Population Current Summer Population Annual Employment
Current – 158,600
Projected (2040) – 176,200
Weekday (Residents + Visitors) – 174,936
Weekend (Residents + Visitors) – 177,509
Current – 73,000
Projected (2040) – 80,000

Cumberland County includes 15 municipalities and is part of the Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Delaware Valley Combined Statistical Area. Its county seat is Bridgeton. Four public-use airports are located in Cumberland County. The total population of the county is over 150,000.

As of the 2010 United States Census, the population density of Cumberland County was 324.4 per square mile and the housing unit average density was 115.4 per square mile.  The racial makeup of the county was 62.74% White, 20.23% Black or African American, 1.11% Native American, 1.22% Asian, .04% Pacific Islander, 11.15% from other races, and 3.52% from two or more races.  Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 27.06% of the population.  The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.26.

As of 2010, the county had a total of 1,271.74 miles of roadways, of which 643.65 miles were maintained by the local municipality, 539.14 miles by Cumberland County and 88.95 miles by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Draft Plan Statistics

Population Current Summer Population Annual Employment
Current – 64,800
Projected (2040) – 62,900
Weekday (Residents + Visitors) – 75,596
Weekend (Residents + Visitors) – 76,708
Current – 28,000
Projected (2040) – 25,100

Salem County includes 16 municipalities and has a population of over 65,000.  Its most populous place is Pennsville Township with over 13,000 residents. Its western boundary is formed by the Delaware River and it has the eastern terminus of the Delaware Memorial Bridge, connecting to New Castle, Delaware.  Its county seat is Salem.

As of the 2010 United States Census, the population density of Salem County was 199.1 per square mile and the housing unit average density was 82.6 per square mile.  The racial makeup of the county was 79.83% White, 14.09% Black or African American, .36% Native American, .84% Asian, .02% Pacific Islander, 2.64% from other races, and 2.22% from two or more races.  Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.82% of the population.  The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.07.

As of 2010, the county had a total of 879.53 miles of roadways, of which 429.36 miles were maintained by the local municipality, 355.17 miles by Salem County, 85.94 miles by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 9.06 miles by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.  Salem is served by many different roads including both major county routes and limited access routes, as well as the Delaware Memorial Bridge, a set of twin suspension bridges crossing the Delaware River connecting New Castle, Delaware, and Pennsville Township.